Child Murderers within the wider Visual Culture of Infanticide and Cannibalism

Keywords: Der Kinderfresser, Wild Man, Witchcraft, Midwives, Cannibalism This Christmas, did your children make it to the naughty or nice list? The image of sixteenth-century Der Kinderfresser (‘the child eater’) is not dissimilar to the modern idea of Santa with large belly, large belt over a long coat, and large black boots, carrying a large… Continue reading Child Murderers within the wider Visual Culture of Infanticide and Cannibalism

Myth-Making in Cannibalistic Portrayals of Native Americans

Keywords: Cannibalism, Native Americans, Hans Staden, Theodor de Bry, William Arens In sixteenth-century prints, Native Americans were depicted in scenes of cannibalism with hanging body parts or in the act of cooking human flesh. Europeans were already preconditioned to associate the foreign Other with man-eaters when exploration shifted to the New World. Native Americans became… Continue reading Myth-Making in Cannibalistic Portrayals of Native Americans

The Dog-Headed Cannibals of John Mandeville’s Travels

Keywords: Cynocephali, Monstrous Races, Cannibalism, John Mandeville, Age of Discovery Depictions of man-eating cynocephali appear in late-fifteenth-century German printed editions of John Mandeville’s Travels, embedded in the texts of a 1481 Basel edition and a copy in a 1499 Strasbourg edition. In the Basel edition, a cynocephalus is depicted on his hands and knees biting… Continue reading The Dog-Headed Cannibals of John Mandeville’s Travels

The Canine Motif and the Dehumanisation of Foreigners

Keywords: Monstrous Races, Cynocephali, Human-animal hybrids, Cannibalism, Dehumanisation That all races, ethnicities, man and woman all belong to the same species sounds like a truism. However, this was of some point of contention during the sixteenth century. The discussion surrounding non-European foreigners paralleled with the discussion involving the mythological monstrous races, including hybrid canine creatures.… Continue reading The Canine Motif and the Dehumanisation of Foreigners

Werewolves, Wolves, and the Intersections between Human and Animal

Keywords: Werewolves, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Cannibalism, Petter Stump, Peter Stump, Peter Stumpf, Peter Stumpp, Wolves One of the earliest werewolf fables originated from the ancient festival of Zeus in Arcadia, Greece. Participants would choose a piece of meat from a mixture of both animal and human sacrifices. Those who unwittingly chose and ate the entrails of… Continue reading Werewolves, Wolves, and the Intersections between Human and Animal