The Monstrous Races in Gregor Reisch’s Margarita Philosophia

Keywords: Monstrous Races, Monstrous Births, Margarita Philosophia, St. Augustine of Hippo, mark of Cain The etymology of the word ‘monster’ is derived from the Latin monere, meaning to warn and were regarded to presage intending calamity (Gilmore, 2003, p. 9). During the Renaissance, monstrous births were considered warnings against sin towards the collective, as well… Continue reading The Monstrous Races in Gregor Reisch’s Margarita Philosophia

The Monster of Cracow: Monstrous Births as Portents during the Reformation

Keywords: Early Modern Monstrous Births, Signs and Portents, Prophesies, Reformation The monstrous birth resembling a demon with faces embedded in its body become known as the Monster of Cracow, after its birthplace in 1547. The image of the monstrous birth was reproduced in multiple prints. It appeared in Jacob Rüeff’s (1500-1558) De conceptu et generatione… Continue reading The Monster of Cracow: Monstrous Births as Portents during the Reformation

Bestiality and Human-Animal Hybrids: Inter-Faith Relations and the Corruption of the Christian Body

Keywords: Monstrous Births, Bestiality, Jews, Monstrous Races, Cynocephali A tale spread across Europe during the sixteenth century of a monstrous birth that possessed the legs and a curled tale of a canine, and the upper body of a young boy. An illustrative woodcut of the ‘dog boy’ posed like an ethnographic portrait appeared in Konrad… Continue reading Bestiality and Human-Animal Hybrids: Inter-Faith Relations and the Corruption of the Christian Body

What is the meaning behind the dog-man conjoined twins in the Nuremberg Chronicle?

Keywords: Monstrous Births, Portents, Papacy, Muslim Turks, Crusades The Nuremberg Chronicle described a monstrous birth that was born with a face of a dog on their back. The artist interpreted this description based on conjoined twins as the birth was portrayed with two heads, one human and one canine, and a shared body. As the… Continue reading What is the meaning behind the dog-man conjoined twins in the Nuremberg Chronicle?

Representations of Monsters in German Renaissance Prints

Keywords: Human-animal hybrids, Monstrous Races, Monstrous Births, Wild Man, Werewolves Representations of human-animal hybrids and the concept of shape-shifting in both literary sources and the visual arts captured the early modern European imagination. This is particularly evident in the prevalence of pictorial prints featuring these creatures dated in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries that… Continue reading Representations of Monsters in German Renaissance Prints